410 Results for:

September 4, 2019

Hong Kong
The Hong Kong Protests, With Jerome A. Cohen

Jerome A. Cohen, adjunct senior fellow for Asia Studies at CFR, discusses with James M. Lindsay the recent protests throughout Hong Kong.

Podcast Students in Hong Kong protest the extradition bill.

September 26, 2019

China
Communist China’s Painful Human Rights Story

The Chinese Communist Party has used arbitrary detention to maintain power since the People’s Republic of China was founded seventy years ago.

Shadows of people are seen in front of an illuminated poster of Xi Jinping.

February 5, 2020

Sub-Saharan Africa
Eighty Years of U.S. Policy Toward Africa, Now in One Place

Until now, there has not been a comprehensive survey of U.S. policy toward Africa for either the specialist or the general reader. Now, happily, there is. Herman J. Cohen (‘Hank’) has just published U.S. Policy Toward Africa: Eight Decades of Realpolitik, covering fourteen U.S. administrations. It is hard to think of anyone as qualified as Ambassador Cohen to undertake such a work. A career Foreign Service Officer, Hank Cohen was, inter alia, charge in the Democratic Republic of Congo, ambassador to Senegal, senior director for Africa at the National Security Council, and assistant secretary for Africa at the U.S. Department of State.

U.S. President George W. Bush and his Rwandan counterpart Paul Kagame cut a ribbon to officially open the U.S. Embassy in the capital of Kigali, on February 19, 2008.

August 13, 2019

Hong Kong
The Crisis in Hong Kong: What to Know

As protesters in Hong Kong use increasingly creative means to demand change, the possibility that Beijing will respond with force is growing.

October 18, 2016

Elections and Voting
Is it Still 1968? A Conversation with Michael A. Cohen

Today, I spoke with Michael A. Cohen, regular contributor at The Boston Globe, about his new book, American Maelstrom: The 1968 Election and the Politics of Division (also available on iTunes here). …

american-maelstrom

June 19, 2019

Hong Kong
What Does the Pause of Hong Kong’s Extradition Bill Mean?

The bill’s future remains uncertain, but no amendments can change the ugly reality of shipping anyone off to Beijing’s incommunicado torture chambers, its denial of competent legal defenders, and its…

Dozens of people wear black shirts during a protest against Hong Kong's extradition bill.

January 3, 2020

Cameroon
Lessons From the Past on Cameroon’s Crisis

The violent conflict in Cameroon, still rarely discussed in Washington, is becoming increasingly dire. Both President Paul Biya’s Francophone regime in Yaounde and the Anglophone separatists in the southwest region are accused of brutal human rights abuses, including the burning of villages, attacks on schools, and the killing of men, women, and children. Despite mediation attempts by the Swiss government and sanctions by the Trump administration, there are no signs of any progress towards a negotiated settlement. 

A sign saying " Speak English or French for a bilingual Cameroon" outside a now abandoned school in rural southwest Cameroon, on May 22, 2019.

October 31, 2016

Conflict Prevention
Understanding Atrocities: A Conversation with Dara Kay Cohen

I spoke with Dara Kay Cohen, assistant professor of public policy at Harvard Kennedy School, about her book, Rape During Civil War. To better understand this underexamined wartime atrocity, Dara buil…

dkc

December 2, 2019

Election 2020
Meet Joe Walsh, Republican Presidential Candidate

Buyer’s remorse. That is perhaps the best description of the situation that former Illinois Congressman and radio talk show host Joe Walsh finds himself in. Back in 2016, he championed Donald Trump’s…

Joe Walsh

October 18, 2016

Elections and Voting
Is it Still 1968? A Conversation with Michael A. Cohen

Today, I spoke with Michael A. Cohen, regular contributor at The Boston Globe, about his new book, American Maelstrom: The 1968 Election and the Politics of Division (also available on iTunes here). …

Podcast Cover