from Women and Foreign Policy Program

Women's Workplace Equality Index

Female petrol station worker operates a fuel pump at a petrol station in the Egyptian capital, Cairo, on November 21, 2016. MOHAMED EL-SHAHED/AFP/Getty Images

Most countries still have laws that make it harder for women to work than men. This inequality shortchanges not only women but also entire economies.

October 16, 2018

Female petrol station worker operates a fuel pump at a petrol station in the Egyptian capital, Cairo, on November 21, 2016. MOHAMED EL-SHAHED/AFP/Getty Images
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Despite the financial stakes, most countries still have laws that make it harder for women to work. Explore the global index that ranks countries on women’s workforce equality. Although inequality for women in the workforce persists worldwide, governments are beginning to understand the costs—and take action.

More on:

Women and Women's Rights

Women and Economic Growth

Inequality

Economics

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