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September 21, 2005

North Korea
North Korea Expert Pritchard: Agreement is a ‘Good’ One, But Dealing with Details Will Be Tough

Charles L. Pritchard, a former top U.S. negotiator with North Korea, says the recently announced set of principles for ending North Korea’s nuclear-weapons program was “a good agreement” and set the …

August 8, 2005

Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and Disarmament
Pritchard: Latest Talks on North Korea ‘Successful’ Due to Major Changes by United States

Charles L. (Jack) Pritchard, a former top U.S. negotiator with North Korea, who quit the State Department in protest against the Bush administration’s reluctance to deal directly with North Korea, sa…

June 14, 2010

North Korea
Need For ’Robust’ Tack on North Korea

The Obama administration should mount a more vigorous effort to address North Korea’s nuclear weapons program, says Charles L. (Jack) Pritchard, co-chairman of a new CFR Independent Task Force report.

June 14, 2010

North Korea
U.S. Policy Toward the Korean Peninsula

As tensions on the Korean peninsula rise after an international investigation found that North Korea was responsible for the sinking of a South Korean warship, a Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) In…

January 24, 2020

Nigeria
Facing Rising Insecurity, Southwest Governors in Nigeria Launch Policing Initiative

In southwest Nigeria (Yorubaland), the location of Nigeria’s commercial capital Lagos, there has been a dramatic upsurge in kidnapping, house invasions, and robbery. On January 9, the governors of the six states in the region announced the establishment of Operation Amotekun (“leopard” in the Yoruba language).

Three armed police officers stand in front of the Novare Shoprite Mall in Lekki, near Lagos, Nigeria, after it was looted, on September 3, 2019.

January 7, 2020

Iran
Death of Iranian General Soleimani Provokes Muted Reaction in Africa’s Giants

Nigeria and South Africa are the giants of Africa, with the two largest economies on the continent.  Both have had long-term relationships with Iran, though South Africa’s has been the closer. Thus far, the official reaction to Soleimani’s death from Nigeria and South Africa has been muted or non-existent, reflecting caution. Though the Nigerian inspector general of police has put his forces on “red alert,” likely fearing action by the Islamic Movement of Nigeria (IMN) or other alleged Iranian proxies, there has been no apparent word from the government. In South Africa, the fiercest reaction came from the African National Congress (ANC), while Naledi Pandor, the South African foreign minister, called for calm.

Women hold pictures of Iranian Major-General Qassem Soleimani, head of the elite Quds Force, who was killed in an air strike at Baghdad airport, during a funeral procession and burial at his hometown in Kerman, Iran, on January 7, 2020.

October 1, 2019

Australia
The President's Inbox: Charles Edel and John Lee on the U.S.-Australia Alliance

The newest episode of The President’s Inbox is live. I sat down with Charles Edel and John Lee, fellows at the University of Sydney’s United States Studies Centre, to talk about the future of the U.S…

Australia touts its history with the United States outside its embassy in Washington, D.C.

February 19, 2020

Middle East and North Africa
The Arab League

Founded as a loose confederation of states in 1945, the Arab League has struggled to overcome dysfunction and disunity among its members.

Flag of Arab League member states accompany the league's seal

February 12, 2020

China
Huawei: China’s Controversial Tech Giant

The Chinese telecommunications company faces accusations from President Donald J. Trump and other leaders that Beijing could use it for cyber espionage. The outcome of the struggle could shape the wo…

A woman in business clothing walks in front of a large screen that displays the red Huawei logo.

November 21, 2019

Nigeria
Abacha, Abiola, and Nigeria’s 1999 Transition to Civilian Rule

The 1999 transition of Nigeria from military to civilian, democratic government, is a defining moment in Nigerian history, representing the beginning of the longest, uninterrupted government since independence in 1960. But what exactly transpired during the period of transition, which began in earnest with the death of military dictator Sani Abacha in1998, is not entirely clear. Max Siollun, in a fascinating study of the period, Nigeria’s Soldiers of Fortune, has done us a service by illuminating some of the behind-the-scenes machinations of that period, and putting to bed some of the rumors that passed for history.

A supporter of Chief Mashood Abiola holds up a newpaper during a demonstration outside the family home July 10 to protest about the suspicious nature of his death.